Your Value Proposition Shouldn't Suit All Customers - Here's Why

YO! Marketing could help you develop a value proposition for your relevant customer groups

I have a confession to make

I want people to like me. When I enter a room, I look for signs that the people in that room think I’m alright. These signs could include:

  • Smiling at me
  • Starting a conversation with me
  • Pulling me into a conversation by asking me questions
  • Making eye contact
  • Nodding in my direction
  • It’s a hard thing to admit in a society that tells us that caring about what people think is bad, a sign of insecurity. On the other hand, we work in business markets where we want to attract as many customers as possible. We study them, and we seem desperate to catch their attention. It is fair to say that we care what customers think. Are businesses therefore insecure?

    Businesses have compromised their value proposition

    Most people, like businesses, want to be liked. But I’ve found that if a room full people all like me, I’m probably not being true to myself. It’s likely that I’m going out of my way (with some of them) to say the things they want to hear. Consciously or unconsciously, I’ve compromised my real value. Do businesses do the same in a bid to secure new customers? I think so.

    In fact, if your value proposition is for all customers alike, I can tell you with a degree of certainty that your business isn’t being true to itself. It’s the old adage of trying to be all things to all men (and women).

    My value proposition doesn’t resonate with everyone

    As much as I want to be liked by everybody, I can’t achieve that without losing sight of my real focus. I have become comfortable with this.

    In a room of ten people, for instance, it is not unusual for me to really hit it off with two or three people. It’s a kind of natural selection and I’ve learned to rejoice in this.
    YO! Marketing offers market research to provide key customer insights
    Therefore, focus on adding value in your unique way. Recognise who you should say, “No” to. You read that right. You will not add value to some customer groups. And the less time you spend on these groups, the better focus you give your business. Hence, it comes down to targeting and positioning, along with a clear value proposition.

    Challenge

    What are your target customer groups and what is your specific value proposition to these groups?

    Stretch challenge

    Which customers are you chasing now that you should be saying, “No” to?

    If you would like support in answering these questions for your business, get in touch with us today

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