Facebook Changes: How Small Businesses Can Still Win Big

Facebook Changes: How Small Businesses Can Still Win Big

Facebook changes are coming. These changes have a significant impact on business pages on Facebook. For small businesses, it could be frustrating. But it could also be a call to step up on valuable, relevant content.

Facebook Changes: Goals

Mark Zuckerberg says the Facebook changes will promote more local and relevant news. On his recent post on the subject, he summarised his motives for the changes as follows:

  • Facebook wants to give users a more personalised experience
  • Based on feedback from Facebook users.  people see too many pieces of content from businesses
  • Facebook wants to increase the quality of content on the platform
  • There is a stronger focus on real engagement and interaction

This could mean less exposure for business pages as these pages move to a secondary news feed, first piloted in October last year. Facebook users will see news from family and friends in a primary newsfeed. The changes also mean that businesses might need to spend more on ads to be seen by their target audience. Small businesses without deep pockets will feel the pinch the most.

Facebook Changes: Don’t Give Up

But small businesses mustn’t give up. 62% of consumers on Facebook say that it is the most important platform for them. A bigger metric is the 80% of users who say that they are more inclined to buy from you if you have a credible, authentic Facebook page associated with your business. Business decision-makers are also keen Facebook users according to a recent article by HootSuite on Facebook Statistics. Therefore, the objective of small businesses should be safeguarding the top one or two spots on the secondary news feed in order to be seen by their target audience.

Facebook Changes: Live video

In this video, I discuss the changes to Facebook and how small businesses can still win the heart of their target audience by creating and publishing valuable content to the right people.

Facebook Changes: What Is A Promo Post?

Promotional posts are Facebook’s pet peeve. Avoid it as much as you can. Not sure if your posts are promotional? These three points just about cover it:

  • The sole purpose of the post is to push people to buy a product
  • You ask people to enter promos, giveaways or contests
  • Your posts reuse the same content for Ads over and over

Facebook Changes: What’s the Solution?

Focus on knowing who to target, how to offer value to them and what you can do to stand out in the newsfeed.

To achieve these best practices when you create content for your Facebook business page:

  • Create videos of min 30 secs, max 90s (longer videos rank higher)
  • High completion rates (50%)
  • Schedule posts on Facebook (instead of on 3rd party platforms like Buffer and HootSuite)
  • No outbound links (e.g. YouTube, blog posts)
  • Upload videos directly to Facebook
  • Don’t boost posts (weak targeting and low conversion rates)
  • Use Ads to target individuals on your business page (check out lookalike audiences)
  • Create Facebook groups and engage there
  • Use great images in posts (emotion, motion, colour)
  • Spend time identifying your audience, grab their attention and build relationships
  • Create motivational and inspirational posts
  • Value offers (how-to videos, PDF cheat sheets, advice, demos)
  • Promote local businesses

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Your marketing strategy makes sense but does it make you money?

Your marketing strategy makes sense but does it make you money?

You won’t forgive me if I said I didn’t have a marketing strategy. And your grudge would be fair. After all, I’m a marketing consultant. My 2018 marketing strategy exists and it makes a lot of sense i.e. I’ll do more of what worked and less of what didn’t. That’s all, right? Well, no. This year, I’ve taken a brutal approach to my traditional planning. Everything I do has to link back to clear KPIs, in particular, MONEY. Yes, the dirty word that few people can discuss.

As a business owner, you probably know how much you want to make this year. It’ll be a percentage increase from last year. Or you might want to generate similar revenues but improve your profit margins.  If your marketing strategy doesn’t help you make the money and margins, don’t bother. I mean it. What you have is another to-do list that you will soon forget.

Ask these questions as you develop your marketing strategy

  • Is your mission for this year the same as last? Why?
  • Are you planning to serve a different kind of customer? If you are targeting larger companies, do you have the credibility, resources and competencies? If not, how will you get it?
  • Do you have a different value proposition for each customer group? Have you understood what each care about so that your product resonates?
  • What is your overall business promise to your customers? To be the best or the cheapest or the most reliable?
  • How much of your revenue will come from marketing efforts?
  • How much will you spend on marketing to get this revenue?
  • What proportion of your revenue will come from repeat customers?
  • Can you get referrals to new customers from existing or previous customers? How will you ask for these referrals?
  • How much of your business will come from referrals e.g. 40%?
  • Which marketing activities will help you achieve these goals e.g. ads, events, SEO, networking etc?
  • How much will you spend on each activity?
  • How will you know that it is working?
  • What kind of content do you need to create to attract and engage new and existing customers?
  • Will you create these materials internally or will you engage an external company?
  • What changes do you need to make to your processes and systems to allow you effectively track and maintain a healthy sales pipeline e.g. CRM, email marketing?
  • What are your non-financial goals e.g. award to win, public speaking engagements, adopting a charity?

These questions will really focus your strategy. If you don’t ever look at your strategy again then it’s unlikely that you are meeting your goals.

marketing strategy template checklist YO! Marketing Aberdeen

To help you keep focused, consider hiring a marketing consultant who understands your industry, not just marketing. An hour or two a month with the consultant can be invaluable in reviewing your marketing efforts against business goals, and making changes if necessary.   You are running your business on limited time, resources and budget. Can you afford to spend time on strategies that don’t take you forward?

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