How I help SMEs get started with social media

How I help SMEs get started with social media

My first digital marketing specialism is social media. After doing research and subsequently publishing my best-selling book, The Smart Sceptic’s Guide to Social Media, I’ve become more involved in developing frameworks and guides for social media in a B2B setting. Social media is probably the most powerful channel for sharing information and knowledge. Over 3 billion people are social media users – that’s 42% of the world! In this blog, I will tell you how I help my clients get started.

Yekemi Otaru published author of The Smart Sceptic's Guide to Social Media in Organisations

Social Media: Do You Really Want It?

I spent over a decade in corporate organisations. One thing I learned is if senior management does not wholly back an initiative, the chances of it succeeding are almost ZERO. This is the same with social media; it is generally a great channel for boosting a company’s brand and developing thought leadership. But the lack of support at a high level could make it unsuccessful.

That’s why I start the “Getting Started” process by establishing affirmation from senior leaders. I work with the MD/CEO to understand the business objectives and expectations from social media use.

Are these expectations realistic?

Also, do senior managers use social media themselves?

For instance, it’s a red flag if the C-suite executives are not on LinkedIn.

Related Blog: Does it matter if your organisation has a social CEO?

Brand surveys such as Brandfog consistently reveal that C-suite engagement on social media makes a brand more honest and trustworthy.

“Since 2013, we’ve seen a 15% increase in the number of respondents who believe that social media engagement makes CEOs more effective leaders. Regarding the changing nature of communications, an astounding 93% of survey respondents view socially engaged CEOs as a means to build better connections with customers, employees, and investors.” – Brandfog survey, 2016

I establish that senior management will genuinely support social media participation for business purposes.

More than once, I’ve had to walk away because the C-suite really weren’t onboard and it saved a headache for all involved.

Social Media: What Do We Need To Do?

Let’s assume that all is well and your C-suite is game. Fantastic!  This is when I put together a proposal that would include a policy, guidelines, training and ongoing support if required. The investment from the client will depend on:

  • How extensively employees will participate in sharing on social media
  • Existing social media policies and guidelines
  • Size of organisation/ Employee number
  • Availability of internal marketing resources
  • Existing knowledge of social media marketing
As an example, I provide training for up to 8 employees with a limited understanding of using social media for business. This costs between £600-£800.  More advanced training costs are a little higher.

If the company accepts my proposal, I work with the MD and/or a designated manager (usually a marketing or communications manager) to understand the current social media status in the company.

Are there existing social media accounts and if so, how well are they working at the moment?

Do employees use social media and are they engaging with their employer’s content?

Related Blog: 20 Tips for getting an employee social media advocacy pilot off the ground

If the company has an online presence, I analyse performance and highlight what’s working and what isn’t working.

I list the actions that will help close the gap between the current status and where the company wants to get to. These actions might include a policy refresh, basic and advanced training and developing strong personal brands for the leadership team.

Sales people using social media as part of their sales techniques outsell 78% of their peers (Source)

Now that we have figured out what we are going to do, are we done?

You’ve guessed it: We are not done. In many ways, we have only started. Many companies spend a lot of time analysing and planning, watching the list of actions and nice-to-haves get longer and longer. It could become difficult to move into action.

When I have a good understanding of actions that can make improvements to my client’s brand, I work on implementing their bespoke policy and delivering training that empowers employees to use social media effectively. This is crucial. I’ve come across policies that are heavily restrictive hence, demotivating employees from taking part in building an organisation’s brand.

Social Media: Smart Sceptic® Framework

I use my Smart Sceptic® Framework to ensure that my clients are getting the best start to social media. This framework summarises the essence of successful social media programs. The detail of this framework can be found in my book mentioned at the beginning of this blog. In summary, agreeing shared values with senior leaders and getting their support to embed those values is a key starting point. It ensures that employees feel affirmed and hence, they are more likely to be motivated to participate in social media for the business.

social media employee advocacy YO! Marketing Yekemi Otaru

Content shared by employees receives 8 times more engagement than content shared by brand channels (Source)

The next step is to create a social media strategy that works for the business. The strategy should be based on the company’s values and it should support business goals. Research shows that experimentation is a big part of successful social media programs. Don’t be afraid to test your strategy with early adopters in your organisation. Experimentation can be controlled by using one social channel or a group of 5 employees, for instance. Having a group of early adopters that understand the policy and can guide others allows me to adequately handover social media participation to an in-house team when the time comes.

Finally, we move into action. Drumming up participation means resourcing the team. There must be a focal point for social media queries. It is important to equip the teams responsible for making social media a success. Train them, support them and recognise them.

Social Media: Taking Sustainable Action

Sometimes, companies want to keep me on a retainer basis. As part of a retainer service, I’d get monthly updates on social media progress and goals. Working closely with the MD and internal team, I would deliver refresher training on topics such as content creation and personal branding on social media. I am also part of the content creation team and available to be the focal point for employees when they have questions or require one-on-one support.

Retainers range from £350-£1,000 per month depending on support needs, contract length and the size of the company.

To make good progress, there needs to be sustained and deliberate efforts to build a participative culture. This takes time.

Related Blog: Employee Social Media Advocacy Stats & Examples

In research with companies like IBM, Dell and Cisco, marketing managers admitted that this could take as much as 18 months. So don’t give up too soon. Social media is worth getting right. Let me know if I can help.

4 Simple Steps for Starting a Business Blog: A Beginner’s Guide

4 Simple Steps for Starting a Business Blog: A Beginner’s Guide

Nearly half of B2B buyers read 3-5 pieces of content before engaging with any salesperson. If you are a B2B technology or computing company, for instance, around 63% of articles in your industry are found and read through Google searches. Depending purely on social media to tell your story is not sufficient as organic searches overtake social media for website referrals. One common way for your potential buyer to find and learn about your business is through content marketing. Therefore, you might consider starting a business blog.

Starting a Business Blog, Step 1: Setting Goals

Starting a business blog YO! Marketing

Step 1: Setting Goals

Before starting a business blog, you must decide what your goals are. Goals differ from business to business so it is important you take time to:

  1. Establish your goals
  2. Identify ways to measure progress towards your goals
  3. Review your goals in case they need to change

Establish your goals

The ultimate goal of blogging is usually to attract new customers. But you must break down your goal into actionable chunks to allow you focus on creating content that meets specific needs. For instance, you might want to establish yourself as a thought leader in your target market. This goal makes sense if you are new on the scene and you have other competitors offering similar products or services.

RELATED CONTENT: How to write a marketing plan

A follow-on goal could be to build an email list of people who are interested in your services. Remember people read many things you have written before signing up for anything. Therefore, showcasing your knowledge through thought leadership is the place to start.

Measure your progress

How will you know whether you’re achieving your goal? If you are building your personal brand as a thought leader, you could measure how many followers you have each month. While it is great to see your follower count increase, don’t get fixated on it. It is more about the quality of your network. Invest in your online relationships by creating content that starts conversations. Get involved in those conversations and reach out via email if appropriate. Other measurements might include webpage traffic, number of likes, number of downloads and shares.

Review your goals

Starting a business blog with specific goals in mind is a great way to focus your efforts. However, things change. If you find that your business has changed or the feedback you receive from customers is not quite what you expected, it’s reasonable to review what you are doing. A Tel Aviv-based B2B marketing agency had to review their content marketing strategy after they discovered that they were being investigated for spam. They started tracking and evaluating everything they were doing including:

  1. Links in their content
  2. Which piece of their content linked to
  3. Groups where they posted content
  4. Who’s the buyer persona we’re addressing
  5. Actual post copy
  6. Which buyer personas each content addressed
  7. Feedback from their target buyer personas

They looked at a few other things but the above shows a thorough review, which led to positive changes in their goals and strategy.

Starting a Business Blog, Step 2: Identify Whom

Starting a business blog YO! Marketing

Step 2: Identify Whom

Identifying why you are writing is great but it is arguably more important to know who you are writing for. Developing buyer personas will help you to create focused and relevant content. If your buyer is an Operations Manager with an objective to maintain staff morale while cutting costs, you can start creating articles that will resonate with that buyer. Every buyer has a different set of challenges so you must segment your content accordingly. Consider using categories and tags to do this. For instance, you might have content about time management hacks, improving staff retention and a separate category for the most effective team collaboration apps. When identifying who you are writing for, consider:

  1. Job responsibility
  2. Greatest challenges

Job responsibility

When developing your buyer’s persona, you must understand what your target buyer is responsible for and what he is accountable for. Write a rough outline of what his or her job description is likely to be. Note key responsibilities. For example:

  • Can he/she make buying decisions?
  • Do he/she have a budget?
  • How big is that budget?
  • Is there a team reporting to him/her?

These sort of questions allow you to better understand the motivations and likely goals of your target buyer. There are several great buyer persona templates on the web like this one on the Alexa Blog.

Greatest challenges

Every job has challenges. To catch your target buyer’s attention, you should offer solutions to their greatest challenges. Now that you understand their job role, you can stand in their shoes and identify the likely challenges that they face. One way to do this is to make a list of all the tasks that are involved in their role. Then against each task, add a measure of performance. Ask yourself: What obstacles would stand in the way of performing well on this measure. You might need to speak to current or previous customers to develop a comprehensive list.

For instance, a Marketing Manager could be tasked with increasing brand awareness for his or her employer. How will the employer know that brand awareness has improved? Perhaps they measure web traffic, time on a web page and the number of followers they have on Twitter. What is likely to make it difficult to achieve good quality web traffic? Poor content, no content or misleading content. Now you can start to provide potential solutions…

Starting a Business Blog, Step 3: Be Practical

Starting a business blog YO! Marketing

Step 3: Be Practical

The most valuable content is always practical and actionable. Valuable content leaves you with at least one thing you can do straight away. Therefore, your readers will be more inclined to tell others about your article. Some ways to create highly valuable content is to:

  1. Answer burning questions
  2. Share interesting/alarming stats about your industry
  3. Create a guide for a beginner or an ultimate guide with more in-depth content for advanced learners

Answer burning questions

There are some great places on the web to find questions that people want answers to. Check out RedditQuora.com and AnswerThePublic.com, for instance. Your customers are also a good source of questions. Also, talk to your customer service team to create a list of frequently asked questions that you can address through your blog posts.

Another approach is to follow popular comment threads in your industry to see what people are saying. This will give you an idea of what is topical. It gives you an opportunity to write content that showcases your knowledge and answers today’s burning questions.

Share interesting/alarming stats

Much like how I started this blog post, stating stats is a powerful way of drawing people in to read your content. Depending on your industry, there are likely to be a worth of resources for trends, stats and case studies that you could use. I often use MarketingCharts.com and WordStream.com. Articles in Entrepreneur.com and Forbes.com tend to include stats. You can follow the links to those stats and find the original report.

Create a guide

I love it when I’m looking for advice on how to do something and I find not just a blog post, but a GUIDE. It’s like, “Wow! All my prayers are answered!” A guide is not just about blogging, it’s about creating lead magnets. Lead magnets are content that your readers are willing to give their email address in exchange for access. They are usually more than a 500-word blog and include more detailed information. Popular guides are how-tos, checklists and cheat sheets. You can also create a guide from a series of blog posts. For instance, if you’ve written a few blogs on start-ups hiring their first employees, you could together a kind of compendium for start-up founders. Designrr is a great tool for turning blogs into e-book guides.

Starting a Business Blog, Step 4: Share Online

Starting a business blog YO! Marketing

Step 4: Share Online

The distribution side of blogging is often forgotten. If you write a blog post on your website, it is not automatically found and read. You will start to get organic readership through online searches but that will take time. A new blog needs lots of exposure and that’s where sharing comes in. Here are some channels to consider before starting a business blog:

  • Social media
  • Email marketing
  • Influencer marketing
  • Online groups and forums

Let’s briefly go through each of these.

Social media

Part of setting goals and identifying your audience includes knowing which social media platforms are relevant to engagement. Don’t try to be everywhere. If you are just starting a business blog, pick 1-2 social media platforms and build an audience there. Follow influencers and engage in conversations.

Email marketing

When people start to sign up to hear from you, that’s a big deal! Email marketing allows you to make direct contact with someone who you already know is interested in what you do. You may build this list from online sign-up forms or from your own list of contacts if you’re starting from scratch. Start somewhere by emailing your blog posts to your contacts. And remember to ask them to share.

Influencer marketing

This type of marketing focuses on influencers rather a target customer. To use influencer marketing, you must identify people that might have an influence over your potential customers. These people usually have a passion for sharing content. Direct your content to them and get them to share your content. Influencer marketing platforms such as Mavrck and Social Bakers are good places to get started.

Online groups and forums

If you create content for a niche audience, online forums are your best friend. You can answer questions with your content and explore the real challenges for people in your industry. Over time, you will be known as a thought leader in your area of choice. This is a great way to build an audience for not just your business blog but for your personal brand too.

Have you recently started a business blog? What is working for you? What isn’t going quite as you thought it would?

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How to use storytelling in your business writing

How to use storytelling in your business writing

When was the last time you engaged and became persuaded by a set of bullet points?

One reason you may not have been persuaded (apart from the potential for boredom) is that our brains are not built to retain information that is set out as bullet points on a slide. In fact, bullet points are the least effective way of sharing ideas.

This explains why Amazon’s CEO, Jeff Bezos repeated his ban of Powerpoint in his 2018 annual letter.

“I’m actually a fan of anecdotes in business”

Jeff Bezos

Neuroscientists have found that the fastest way to share ideas in business is through stories – particularly ones that trigger emotions.

The narrative structure of stories is more impactful than bullet points on PowerPoint, our brains are wired for narratives such as storytelling.

Other studies have proven that social storytelling is responsible for more than 65% of conversations had in public. It, therefore, makes sense that when you write content for your business, you’ll get more online engagement if you tell stories about your brand. Storytelling is a great way to keep your online messages consistent throughout your website, social media and blogs.

So why do we try to sell our vision and spread ideas through bullet points? It isn’t very inspiring.

Here are four storytelling ideas for creating content for your business:

Storytelling: Customer stories & anecdotes

storytelling - YO! Marketing

Through Your Customers’ Eyes: Customer Stories & Anecdotes

Jeff Bezos notes that when the anecdotes and metrics (data) disagree, the anecdotes are usually right.

Customer stories are a credible way of demonstrating your expertise as a business. Ask customers about how they came to use your product and/or service. What did they try before and how did it feel to work with your company? Document the customer’s journey from finding out about your product/service to getting real outcomes from their interaction with you. It could be rags-to-riches, which develops an instant rapport with your readers and is inspiring.

Storytelling: Pictures, Videos, Action

storytelling - YO! Marketing

A Picture Tells A Thousand Words: Use Images, Videos & Action

Neuroscientists have proved that we recall things better when we see pictures compared to when we read text on a slide.

According to a report by Social Media Examiner, 74% of marketers are using visual assets. Visual marketing can help you tell a consistent story with every image, matching with your brand style. Also use video when possible, with eye-catching shots and engaging conversations by staff, suppliers and customers.

Storytelling: Analogies & Metaphors

storytelling - YO! Marketing

Get Creative: Use Analogies & Metaphors

As a child growing up in Africa, I was told many stories about the tortoise, the hare and the elephant. There were always lessons in those stories – lessons about the world, manners and good character.

Stories are not just for children and young adults. A great story teaches, inspires and engages. Try using analogies and metaphors to convey your idea to your readers. I once used the analogy of a duck on the water to describe the ease of using a certain software. The duck represented the simplicity and slickness of use while the duck’s feet pedalling like mad in water represented the robustness and accuracy of the algorithm behind the software. It worked very well in conveying a distinct competitive advantage.

Storytelling: Fictional Characters, Buyer Personas

storytelling - YO! Marketing

Show You Understand: Use Fictional Characters & Buyer Personas

One of the coolest ways to engage your target audience is to show them you know what is it like to be them.

In a recent video, I used a fictional company to show how B2B companies struggle with internal and external alignment. This video was based on buyer personas, created from years of experience dealing with marketing, sales and engineering teams in medium to large technical industries. Sometimes, they fail to understand their competitive environment well enough to create a unique competitive advantage. The video illustrated an understanding of that misalignment and proposed a solution.


Are there any other types of stories you can tell about your business? Tell us in the comments and share this blog with your network!
Win a Content Strategy for B2B Session – Name the Robot!

Win a Content Strategy for B2B Session – Name the Robot!

We would love to support you in creating an engaging content strategy for your business.

  • This summer, we will run a couple of contests that we hope will be fun AND provide you with FREE content strategy and marketing support.
  • Our first contest is to name the robots of Robots Inc, a fictitious company that builds custom robotic devices for the B2B market.
  • It has a growing customer base, supported by a small sales and marketing team.
  • The company just launched a new robot but potential buyers don’t understand how the new robot can solve their challenge.
  • The sales team actively engage with potential buyers and marketing occasionally push out content via social media.
  • Yet, sales are slow and the target customers don’t see why they should switch to a new product.

What will you gain from a content strategy session?

You will be able to answer these questions about your business:

  • Who is your target customer and what is the value you offer them?
  • How will you ensure engagement and sales leads from content?
  • What are 1-2 key topics that you can create content for?

 

RELATED BLOG: How to use a content scorecard for better blog posts [CALCULATOR]

 

How to enter the contest and WIN a content strategy session

It started on LinkedIn a few days ago. Here’s the post, which includes instructions.

Here are a few quick tips:

  • Watch the video
  • Pick a robot
  • Give it a name
  • Tell me your reason for giving that name ( I love WHYs so don’t hold back here!)
  • Give your answers on the LinkedIn post OR

email info@yomarketing.co with your entry. Use ROBOTS in your subject title.

Your contact details WILL NOT be stored for future correspondence. If you’d like to get in touch separately, please do so)

Winners (max 3) will be contacted by 30 June.

Other Information: Content Strategy Session

Content strategy sessions will be held in August 2018

The session will be face-to-face if a winner is based in Aberdeen, Scotland

If a winner is outside Aberdeen, the session will be remote via Skype or Facetime.

Please share this post with your friends and colleagues.

Content Ideas for Software Companies

Content Ideas for Software Companies

We are huge content fans! That’s why we brought you 12 engaging content ideas for engineering companies and 12 Business Blog Ideas from London Hottest Startups. Now we would like to suggest content ideas for software companies as we work with a few of these businesses.

Do you struggle to engage with your audience as effectively as you would like? Do you often find yourself stuck for ideas for content? This blog sets out content ideas for software companies seeking to kickstart their company blog.

List useful resources

A simple but helpful blog is always a good place to start for content ideas for software companies. This could include a bunch of online tools. Or you could highlight resources that would help any organisation regardless of industry. Team Gate’s blog looks at 400 awesome free resources you can use to grow your business. It includes everything from social media and community management to SEO and website analysers.

Use video instead of text

Consider using video content instead of text. Video allows you to show your personality and convey your passion for the topic. Recent stats show that 43% of people want to see more video content from marketers and over half of the marketing professionals say video gives the best ROI. In fact, over half a billion people watch a video on Facebook every day. That equates to around 8.3% of the people on earth! Wistia, a video platform for marketers, publishes mainly high-quality video content alongside text-based posts.

content ideas for software companies YO! Marketing

Discuss the hottest tech trends

When considering content ideas for software companies, you cannot go wrong if you write about latest technology trends. Some examples of the latest trends in the software industry today include:

Blockchain Technology

Businesses in every industry are going to start building apps on blockchain platforms, which means the demand for blockchain developers is going to go through the roof. There is also interest in blockchain news in general, therefore content on the topic will likely attract many readers.

Cybersecurity

Similar to Blockchain, cybersecurity is an area which a growing number of developers are finding demand in. In recent years, cyber attacks against organisations have been increasing in both sophistication and damage caused. Articles on cybersecurity would be a good way to enter into regular posts regarding the topic. A good example is an article by The Market Mogul, which describes cybersecurity as ‘The focal point of 2018’ and sets the scene on the topic.

Big Data

A guide to data management and data governance could be the first step for people setting up their big data initiatives. Eric Brown, an entrepreneur, data scientist and consultant wrote a useful blog called ‘A roadmap to success with big data’. This article gives a good idea of some of the essentials worth considering when starting out with big data.

Artificial Intelligence

The use of AI in improving and personalising your customer service is the obvious topic to go for. However, there are countless areas for discussion within this area. AI is being used in supply chain management and even creating a better hiring process. Interviewed developed a software which uses machine learning and natural language processing to sift through resumes to filter the best ones out from the rest.

Respond to industry research

Consider using a new angle to trigger a conversation. Industry research always attracts discussion amongst readers, especially in the comments section of the posting. It would be smart to be first to publish your own thoughts on latest industry research. If you do this, try approaching it from a new perspective to give your readers some food for thought.

The Economist gave a different angle towards automation – mentioning that over half of jobs are vulnerable to automation taking over.

Support software project managers

Software developers use programming languages such as C++ and Javascript. However, developers might b required to use less common languages or platforms in their projects. A step by step guide that assists software developers will attract many readers and shares. Theodo’s blog, for instance, has several posts tackling how to work efficiently in a new and unfamiliar environment.

Talk about all things Javascript

Insights and advice on all things Javascript will be useful to any software developer. This could be presented in the form of worked examples, smart tips or even the latest updates and developments. Some inspiration for content could be found in DailyJS blogs.

Outline how to choose an IoT platform provider

There is a shift within IoT (Internet of Things) from building your own IoT stack to choosing from a range of IoT platform providers. This blog could cover the top categories of considerations that are the foundation of choosing an IoT platform provider – such as security and return on investment. This will assist developers when making the important choice.

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