When was the last time you engaged and became persuaded by a set of bullet points?

One reason you may not have been persuaded (apart from the potential for boredom) is that our brains are not built to retain information that is set out as bullet points on a slide. In fact, bullet points are the least effective way of sharing ideas.

This explains why Amazon’s CEO, Jeff Bezos repeated his ban of Powerpoint in his 2018 annual letter.

“I’m actually a fan of anecdotes in business”

Jeff Bezos

Neuroscientists have found that the fastest way to share ideas in business is through stories – particularly ones that trigger emotions.

The narrative structure of stories is more impactful than bullet points on PowerPoint, our brains are wired for narratives such as storytelling.

Other studies have proven that social storytelling is responsible for more than 65% of conversations had in public. It, therefore, makes sense that when you write content for your business, you’ll get more online engagement if you tell stories about your brand. Storytelling is a great way to keep your online messages consistent throughout your website, social media and blogs.

So why do we try to sell our vision and spread ideas through bullet points? It isn’t very inspiring.

Here are four storytelling ideas for creating content for your business:

Storytelling: Customer stories & anecdotes

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Through Your Customers’ Eyes: Customer Stories & Anecdotes

Jeff Bezos notes that when the anecdotes and metrics (data) disagree, the anecdotes are usually right.

Customer stories are a credible way of demonstrating your expertise as a business. Ask customers about how they came to use your product and/or service. What did they try before and how did it feel to work with your company? Document the customer’s journey from finding out about your product/service to getting real outcomes from their interaction with you. It could be rags-to-riches, which develops an instant rapport with your readers and is inspiring.

Storytelling: Pictures, Videos, Action

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A Picture Tells A Thousand Words: Use Images, Videos & Action

Neuroscientists have proved that we recall things better when we see pictures compared to when we read text on a slide.

According to a report by Social Media Examiner, 74% of marketers are using visual assets. Visual marketing can help you tell a consistent story with every image, matching with your brand style. Also use video when possible, with eye-catching shots and engaging conversations by staff, suppliers and customers.

Storytelling: Analogies & Metaphors

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Get Creative: Use Analogies & Metaphors

As a child growing up in Africa, I was told many stories about the tortoise, the hare and the elephant. There were always lessons in those stories – lessons about the world, manners and good character.

Stories are not just for children and young adults. A great story teaches, inspires and engages. Try using analogies and metaphors to convey your idea to your readers. I once used the analogy of a duck on the water to describe the ease of using a certain software. The duck represented the simplicity and slickness of use while the duck’s feet pedalling like mad in water represented the robustness and accuracy of the algorithm behind the software. It worked very well in conveying a distinct competitive advantage.

Storytelling: Fictional Characters, Buyer Personas

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Show You Understand: Use Fictional Characters & Buyer Personas

One of the coolest ways to engage your target audience is to show them you know what is it like to be them.

In a recent video, I used a fictional company to show how B2B companies struggle with internal and external alignment. This video was based on buyer personas, created from years of experience dealing with marketing, sales and engineering teams in medium to large technical industries. Sometimes, they fail to understand their competitive environment well enough to create a unique competitive advantage. The video illustrated an understanding of that misalignment and proposed a solution.


Are there any other types of stories you can tell about your business? Tell us in the comments and share this blog with your network!

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